Types of Cancer | List all of Cancers | Adult, Children, Head and neck, Digestive and Types of Blood Cancer

Types of cancer

Types of Cancer, An Overview of Different Types of Cancer

The word “cancer” is a generic term for a large group of diseases that can affect any part of the body. We also speak of malignant tumors or neoplasms. One of the hallmarks of cancer is the rapid multiplication of abnormal growing cells, which can invade nearby parts of the body and then migrate to other organs. This is called metastasis, which is the main cause of death from cancer.

By delving into the intricacies of different types of cancer, this comprehensive guide aims to empower individuals with knowledge and understanding. Remember, early detection and timely treatment can significantly improve outcomes for cancer patients. Stay informed, advocate for regular screenings, and consult with healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible care. Together, we can make strides in the fight against cancer.

February 4: World Cancer Day

Cancer is a complex disease that requires early detection and prompt treatment. Being aware of the common types of cancer and their symptoms can help you recognize potential warning signs and seek medical attention. Remember to talk to your doctor about any concerns you may have, and always follow recommended screening guidelines.

An overview of different types of cancer includes a wide range of diseases that affect various parts of the body. Some common types of cancer include breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, skin cancer, and ovarian cancer. Other less common types of cancer include bone cancer, bladder cancer, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. Each type of cancer has its own unique set of symptoms, risk factors, and treatment options, making early detection and diagnosis critical for successful outcomes.

What is a cancer cell?

Our cells divide to ensure the growth and renewal of tissues in our body. This process is orchestrated, in each cell, by a set of genes. A cancer cell is a cell that has suffered a genetic accident. The process of division can then become uncontrollable: the cells multiply in an anarchic way, and the resulting cells will in turn multiply in excess. In some cases, these cells become immortal and this accumulation of abnormal cells creates the malignant tumor.

Adult types of cancer (in alphabetical order of the area concerned):

Here are some of the most common adult types of cancer in alphabetical order of the area concerned:

Bladder cancer refers to the abnormal growth of cells in the bladder, which is responsible for storing urine. It can cause symptoms such as blood in the urine, frequent urination, and pain during urination. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy.

Brain cancer is a condition characterized by the abnormal growth of cells in the brain. It can cause a variety of symptoms depending on the location and type of tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Breast cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the breast tissue. It is the most common cancer among women. Symptoms may include a lump in the breast, changes in breast shape or size, nipple discharge, or skin changes. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapy.

Bone cancer refers to the abnormal growth of cells in the bones. It can arise in the bone itself or spread from another site. Common symptoms include bone pain, fractures, and swelling. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Carcinoma is a type of cancer that originates in the epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the body’s organs and tissues. It can affect various organs and may be categorized into different subtypes such as squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.

Cervical cancer develops in the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus. It is often caused by persistent infection with certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). Symptoms may include abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain during intercourse, and pelvic pain. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, affects the colon or rectum. It usually begins as a polyp, a small growth on the inner lining of the colon or rectum, which can become cancerous over time. Common symptoms include changes in bowel habits, blood in the stool, abdominal pain, and unintentional weight loss. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Choroidal melanoma is a type of cancer that develops in the choroid, which is the layer of blood vessels in the back of the eye. It can cause vision changes and may spread to other parts of the body, leading to metastases. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, laser treatment, and surgery.

Uterine cancer, also known as womb cancer, and endometrial cancer refer to the abnormal growth of cells in the uterus. Symptoms may include abnormal vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, and a feeling of fullness in the abdomen. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapy.

Esophageal cancer occurs in the esophagus, which is the tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach. It can cause symptoms such as difficulty swallowing, chest pain, and unintended weight loss. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Eye cancer can affect different parts of the eye, including the retina, choroid, or the tissues surrounding the eye. Symptoms may include changes in vision, eye pain, and a visible mass in or around the eye. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, laser treatment, and surgery.

  • gastrointestinal stromal tumor

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors that occur in the digestive tract, primarily in the stomach or small intestine. They arise from cells called interstitial cells of Cajal. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and a mass in the abdomen. Treatment options may include surgery, targeted therapy, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  • hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer. It typically develops in individuals with chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or cirrhosis. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, jaundice, weight loss, and fatigue. Treatment options may include surgery, liver transplantation, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and chemotherapy.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system, particularly the lymph nodes. It is characterized by the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells. Common symptoms include swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, night sweats, and itching. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Kaposi’s sarcoma is a rare cancer that develops from the cells lining the blood vessels. It is often associated with a viral infection called human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) or Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). It can appear on the skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. Treatment options depend on the extent of the disease and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy.

Kidney cancer refers to the abnormal growth of cells in the kidneys. The most common type of kidney cancer is renal cell carcinoma. Symptoms may include blood in the urine, flank pain, abdominal mass, and unexplained weight loss. Treatment options may include surgery, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and radiation therapy.

  • Laryngeal cancer (voice box)

Laryngeal cancer, also known as cancer of the voice box, develops in the tissues of the larynx. Symptoms may include hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, persistent cough, and a lump in the neck. Treatment options depend on the stage and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow, where abnormal white blood cells are produced. It is classified into different types based on the specific cells affected. Symptoms may include fatigue, frequent infections, easy bleeding or bruising, and bone pain. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of leukemia and may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiation therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Li-Fraumeni syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that increases the risk of developing various cancers, including breast cancer, brain tumors, bone sarcomas, and adrenal gland tumors. It is caused by mutations in the TP53 gene. Management typically involves regular screenings and proactive measures to reduce cancer risks.

Liver cancer refers to the abnormal growth of cells in the liver. The most common type is hepatocellular carcinoma. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, jaundice, weight loss, and fatigue. Treatment options may include surgery, liver transplantation, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and chemotherapy.

Lung cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the lungs grow out of control. It is often linked to smoking but can also occur in non-smokers. Symptoms may include persistent cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, and unintended weight loss. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of lung cancer and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.

Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Lymphomas are cancers that affect the lymphatic system, which is a part of the immune system. Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by the presence of Reed-Sternberg cells, while non-Hodgkin lymphoma encompasses various subtypes. Symptoms may include swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, unexplained weight loss, night sweats, and itching. Treatment options depend on the specific subtype, stage, and individual factors, and may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

  • Mesothelioma (thin layer of tissue that covers many of the internal organs, most common area affected is the lining of the lungs and chest wall)

Mesothelioma is a type of cancer that affects the mesothelium, which is a thin layer of tissue that covers many of the internal organs. The most common area affected is the lining of the lungs and chest wall. It is primarily caused by exposure to asbestos. Symptoms may include chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, and weight loss. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer that develops in plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell that normally produces antibodies. It typically affects the bone marrow and can lead to the overproduction of abnormal plasma cells. Symptoms may include bone pain, fatigue, frequent infections, and unexplained weight loss. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.

Myeloma, also known as multiple myeloma, is a cancer that affects plasma cells in the bone marrow. It results in the overgrowth of abnormal plasma cells, which can crowd out healthy cells and impair normal bone marrow function. Symptoms may include bone pain, fatigue, frequent infections, and anemia. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, targeted therapy, and supportive care.

  • oral cancer

Oral cancer refers to cancer that develops in the tissues of the mouth, including the lips, tongue, gums, and throat. It is often associated with tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Symptoms may include mouth sores, difficulty swallowing, persistent pain, and changes in speech. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Osteosarcoma is a type of bone cancer that primarily affects children and young adults. It originates in the cells that form new bone tissue. Symptoms may include bone pain, swelling, fractures, and limited range of motion. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

Ovarian cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the ovaries grow out of control. It is often difficult to detect in its early stages, which contributes to its high mortality rate. Symptoms may include abdominal bloating, pelvic pain, changes in bowel habits, and frequent urination. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and radiation therapy.

Pancreatic cancer develops in the tissues of the pancreas, an organ responsible for producing digestive enzymes and insulin. It is often difficult to diagnose in its early stages, leading to a lower survival rate. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, jaundice, unexplained weight loss, and digestive problems. Treatment options may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.

Plasmacytoma is a type of cancer that originates in plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell. It is closely related to multiple myeloma and may develop in the bone marrow or other tissues. Plasmacytomas can occur as a single tumor or multiple tumors. Treatment options may include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Prostate cancer is a cancer that develops in the prostate gland, which is part of the male reproductive system. It is one of the most common cancers in men. Symptoms may include difficulty urinating, blood in the urine or semen, erectile dysfunction, and pain in the lower back or hips. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and immunotherapy.

Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare type of cancer that develops in the soft tissues, specifically in the skeletal muscle tissues. It is most commonly diagnosed in children and adolescents. Symptoms may vary depending on the location of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Sarcoma is a broad term that refers to a group of cancers that develop in the connective tissues, such as bones, muscles, and fat. There are various subtypes of sarcoma, each with its own characteristics and treatment approaches. Symptoms may depend on the specific subtype and location of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that develops in the cells that produce melanin, which gives color to the skin, hair, and eyes. It is typically associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, such as from the sun or tanning beds. Melanoma can occur on any part of the body, including areas not exposed to the sun. Early detection is crucial, as melanoma can spread to other parts of the body. Treatment options may include surgery, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

  • skin tumor

A skin tumor refers to an abnormal growth or lump that develops in the skin. It can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). There are various types of skin tumors, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Symptoms and treatment options may vary depending on the specific type of skin tumor. Early detection and appropriate management are important for optimal outcomes.

  • small cell lung carcinoma

Small cell lung carcinoma, also known as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), is a type of lung cancer that typically starts in the bronchi, the airways of the lungs. It is characterized by the rapid growth of small, oat-shaped cancer cells. SCLC is often associated with heavy smoking and tends to spread quickly to other parts of the body. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.

Soft tissue sarcoma refers to a group of cancers that develop in the soft tissues of the body, such as muscles, tendons, fat, blood vessels, and nerves. There are many different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, each with its own unique characteristics and treatment options. Common symptoms may include a lump or swelling in the affected area. Treatment may involve surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Stomach cancer, also known as gastric cancer, is a type of cancer that forms in the cells of the stomach lining. It is more common in older individuals and may not cause noticeable symptoms in the early stages. As the cancer progresses, symptoms such as abdominal pain, indigestion, nausea, and weight loss may occur. Treatment options for stomach cancer may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy.

Testicular cancer is a cancer that develops in the testicles, which are the male reproductive organs responsible for producing sperm and testosterone. It is one of the most common types of cancer in young men. The most common symptom is a painless lump or swelling in the testicles. Testicular cancer has a high cure rate, especially when diagnosed and treated early. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surveillance.

Thyroid cancer occurs when abnormal cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland, which is located in the front of the neck. It is more common in women and typically has a good prognosis when detected early. Common symptoms may include a lump or swelling in the neck, difficulty swallowing, and changes in voice. Treatment options for thyroid cancer may include surgery, radioactive iodine therapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapy.

Types of cancer in Children’s

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in children and adolescents, especially in high-income countries. When a child is diagnosed with cancer, the likelihood of survival varies by country: in high-income countries, more than 80% of children with cancer recover, but in many low- and middle-income countries, this proportion is only 15% to 45%.

Read also: ATRT Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor

Several factors explain these lower survival rates in low- and middle-income countries, including: late diagnosis, which is made at an advanced stage of the disease, inability to obtain an accurate diagnosis, inaccessible therapies, treatment discontinuation, deaths from toxicity (side effects) and preventable relapses. Improving access to childhood cancer care, including essential medicines and technologies, is highly cost-effective, possible, and can improve survival in any situation. Source: WHO (World Health Organization

Some common types of cancer in children include:
  • Osteosarcoma (bone cancer): is a type of bone cancer that primarily affects children and adolescents. It commonly occurs in the long bones, such as the arms or legs.
  • Brain and spinal cord: it can occur in children and can vary in type and location. Examples include medulloblastoma, glioma, ependymoma, and astrocytoma.
  • Brain and Central Nervous System (CNS) Tumors: Brain tumors can develop in different parts of the brain and CNS. Examples include medulloblastoma, glioma, ependymoma, and astrocytoma.
  • Hodgkin lymphoma: Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It can occur in children and adolescents and typically presents as swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, fever, and weight loss.
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: is another type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It can occur in children and encompasses various subtypes, such as Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoblastic lymphoma.
  • Childhood leukemia: is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. In children, the most common types are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML).
  • Neuroblastoma (cancer of the nerve tissue): is a cancer that arises in immature nerve cells. It typically affects children under the age of 5 and commonly develops in the adrenal glands (located on top of the kidneys) or in nerve tissue along the spine, chest, abdomen, or pelvis.
  • Retinoblastoma (eye cancer): is an eye cancer that primarily affects young children. It develops in the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It usually occurs in children aged 0 to 5 years and can affect one or both eyes.
  • Rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer of the muscles): is a cancer that originates in the soft tissues, particularly in the muscles. It can occur in various parts of the body, including the head and neck area, urinary and reproductive organs, and limbs.
  • Wilms tumor (cancer of the kidneys): also known as nephroblastoma, is a kidney cancer that typically occurs in children. It usually affects children aged 3 to 4 years and is rare in older children or adults.

It’s important to note that these are just a few examples of the common types of cancer in children. There are other types of cancers that can affect children as well. If you suspect any signs or symptoms or have concerns about your child’s health, it’s crucial to seek medical attention and consult with a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and diagnosis.

Head and neck cancers

Head and neck cancers refer to a group of cancers that develop in the tissues of the head and neck region. This includes cancers of the oral cavity (mouth), pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), nasal cavity, sinuses, salivary glands, and other structures in the head and neck area. Here are some examples of head and neck cancers:

  1. Hypopharyngeal – also throat : this cancer affects the hypopharynx, which is the lower part of the throat, near the voice box and esophagus.
  2. Laryngeal – also throat: it develops in the larynx, commonly known as the voice box, which is located in the throat, which is responsible for producing sound.
  3. Mouth Mouth cancer can occur in various parts of the mouth, including the lips, tongue, gums, and inner lining of the cheeks.
  4. Nasal and paranasal: this type of cancer affects the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses, which are air-filled spaces around the nose.
  5. Nasopharyngeal – also throat: it develops in the nasopharynx, which is the upper part of the throat, behind the nose.
  6. Oropharyngeal – also throat: it involves the back of the throat, including the base of the tongue, tonsils, and soft palate.
  7. Salivary gland: it can occur in any of the salivary glands, including the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands.
  8. Oral cavity cancer: This includes cancers of the lips, tongue, gums, inner lining of the cheeks, roof, and floor of the mouth.
  9. Pharyngeal cancer: This includes cancers of the pharynx, which is the hollow tube that starts behind the nose and leads to the esophagus. It includes nasopharyngeal cancer, oropharyngeal cancer, and hypopharyngeal cancer.
  10. Nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer: These cancers develop in the nasal cavity and the air-filled spaces around the nasal cavity called paranasal sinuses.
  11. Salivary gland cancer: Salivary gland cancers can develop in the major salivary glands, such as the parotid glands, submandibular glands, and sublingual glands.
  12. Thyroid cancer: Although the thyroid gland is located in the neck, it is classified as an endocrine cancer rather than a head and neck cancer. However, it is often managed by head and neck specialists.

Digestive cancers

Digestive cancers are a group of cancers that affect the organs involved in digestion, such as the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, colon, and rectum.

  • Anal: it develops in the tissues of the anus, which is the opening at the end of the rectum. Most anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, which originate from the squamous cells lining the anal canal. Risk factors for anal cancer include infection with certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), history of anal intercourse, and smoking.
  • Bile duct: also known as cholangiocarcinoma, occurs in the bile ducts, which are small tubes that carry bile from the liver to the small intestine. Bile duct cancer can be intrahepatic (within the liver) or extrahepatic (outside the liver). It can block the bile flow, leading to symptoms like jaundice, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Risk factors for bile duct cancer include primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic liver disease, and exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.
  • Colon / Colorectal: a colorectal cancer refers to cancers that develop in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of digestive cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas.
  • Esophageal: it develops in the lining of the esophagus, the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. There are two main types: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.
  • Gallbladder: a cancer affects the gallbladder, a small organ that stores bile. It is relatively rare but can be aggressive.
  • Liver: liver cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma, typically arises from liver cells and is often associated with underlying liver disease, such as cirrhosis.
  • Pancreatic: it begins in the cells of the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The most common type is pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
  • Small intestine: is a rare type of cancer that can develop in different parts of the small intestine, such as the duodenum, jejunum, or ileum.
  • Stomach: also known as gastric cancer, originates in the cells lining the stomach. The most common type is adenocarcinoma.
  • Esophageal cancer: esophageal cancer develops in the lining of the esophagus, the muscular tube that connects the throat to the stomach. There are two main types: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma.

These are just a few examples of digestive cancers. Each type of cancer may present with different symptoms, risk factors, and treatment options. Early detection and timely treatment are crucial for better outcomes. If you have concerns or notice any persistent digestive symptoms, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and guidance.

Types of Blood Cancer

Types of blood cancer, also known as hematological malignancies, include leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma, which all originate in the bone marrow and affect the production and function of blood cells.

What are cancers called?

Most cancers are named after the part of the body in which they originated, such as breast cancer or prostate cancer. But others have scientific names like leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. And some types of cancer are named after who discovered them, like Hodgkin lymphoma (for Hodgkin) and Wilms tumor (a type of kidney cancer that affects children).

Cancers are also named after the type of tissue in which they originate.

Carcinoma

Carcinoma is cancer that starts in the skin or the tissues that line or cover organs. This coating is called the epithelium and is made up of different types of cells. Carcinomas are the most common types of cancer. Here are some examples:

  • adenocarcinoma starts in glandular cells such as those in the intestine, lungs or prostate;
  • basal cell carcinoma starts in the skin;
  • squamous cell carcinoma starts in the skin (called squamous cell carcinoma) or in mucous membranes such as those lining the mouth and vagina;
  • Transitional carcinoma starts in the urinary tract inside organs such as the bladder or ureters.

Sarcoma

Sarcoma is cancer that starts in connective or supporting tissues such as bones, muscles, fat, cartilage, and blood vessels. Sarcoma is rarer than carcinoma. Here are some examples:

Melanoma

Melanoma is a type of cancer that starts in cells called melanocytes. These cells make melanin, a pigment responsible for the color of the skin. Most melanomas appear on the skin, but they can also appear in any part of the body that contains melanocytes, such as the anus and eyes.

Blood cancers

Leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma is Bone Marrow Cancer and multiple myeloma are types of cancer of the blood.

Leukemia

Leukemia starts in the bone marrow, where blood cells are made. In people with leukemia, there are many abnormal blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. This type of cancer does not form a solid tumor.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is cancer that starts in lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that is part of the immune system and the lymphatic system. In people with lymphoma, many abnormal lymphocytes are found to accumulate in the lymph nodes, lymph vessels, bone marrow, spleen and other parts of the body.

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell made in the bone marrow. Plasma cells are part of the immune system and they produce antibodies that fight infections. In people with multiple myeloma, many abnormal plasma cells, called myeloma cells, are found to accumulate in the bone marrow. Myeloma cells can form tumors in bones or other tissues.

It’s important to note that each type of cancer has its own characteristics, symptoms, and treatment options. Consultation with healthcare professionals is essential for accurate diagnosis, proper treatment, and ongoing care.

Are all tumors cancerous?

No. Some types are non-cancerous (benign). Non-cancerous tumors are made up of cells that stay in one place and do not spread. But these tumors can still get quite large. Non-cancerous tumors also don’t usually come back after they’re removed.

Other types are cancerous (malignant). Cancerous tumors can invade nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body. It happens when cancer cells enter the blood or the lymphatic system. Even after the cancerous tumor is removed, the cancer may come back because cancer cells may have already spread from the tumor to other parts of the body.

It is important to find the cancer as soon as possible, because it is usually smaller and easier to treat and less likely to have spread.

Lipoma is a fat benign tumor (skin lumps) – Symptoms, Treatments, Risks

Treatments and Medications for Cancer

When it comes to combating cancer, there is a wide range of treatments and medications available. Each treatment option and medication works in a unique way to target cancer cells and improve patient outcomes. Here is a comprehensive overview of these different approaches:

Information: Cleverly Smart is not a substitute for a doctor. Always consult a doctor to treat your health condition.

Sources: PinterPandai, WHO (World Health Organization), NHS UK, Cancer Center, Web MD, American Cancer Society, European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), Cancer Council Australia, National Cancer Institute (NIH), International Agency for Research on Cancer, National Cancer Centre Singapore

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

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