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STD – STI | List of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Infections

STD - STI | List of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Infections

STD - STI | List of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Infections

STD Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Sexually transmitted diseases or STD are infections that are typically, but not exclusively, transmitted from human to human through sexual contact. Sexually transmitted diseases (STD), now called sexually transmitted infections (STI) are infectious diseases are infections caused by bacteria, viruses and parasites and transmitted through sexual contact.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are caused by different microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi or parasites) and are transmitted during sexual intercourse.

Sexually transmitted diseases can be bacterial, viral, or caused by protozoa.
Some infections can also be spread through kissing or close physical contact.
Some infections can spread to other parts of the body, sometimes with serious consequences.
Using condoms can prevent these infections.
Most sexually transmitted diseases can be treated effectively with medication.

STD Sexually transmitted diseases by type of sexual intercourse

The following table summarizes the risks of transmission of STD Sexually Transmitted Disease or sexually transmitted infections by type of intercourses:

Transmission (and risk of transmission) by type of intercourse
STI Other IST
Doing blowjob
(fellation)
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea (25–30%)
  • Herpes (rare)
  • HPV
  • Syphilis (1%)
  • Hepatitis B (low risk)
  • HIV (0.01%)
  • Hepatitis C (unknown risk)
  • Papillomavirus (HPV)
Do cunnilingus
(eating pussy)
  • Herpes
  • HPV
  • Gonorrhea
  • Chlamydia
  • Papillomavirus (HPV)
Receive a blowjob
(fellation)
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Herpes
  • Syphilis (1%)
  • HPV or papillomavirus (HPV)
Receive cunnilingus
(eating pussy)
  • Herpes
  • HPV or papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Gonorrhea
Vaginal coitus
(Sexual intercourse)

– person penetrating

  • Chlamydia (30–50%)
  • Gonorrhea (22%)
  • Hepatitis B
  • Herpes (0.07% for genital herpes)
  • HIV (0.05%)
  • HPV (40-50%)
  • Mycoplasma hominis
  • Mycoplasma genitalium
  • Syphilis
  • Trichomonas vaginalis
  • Ureaplasma urealyticum
  • Hepatitis C
  • Pubic louse
  • Scabies
Vaginal coitus
(Sexual intercourse)
– person get
penetrated
  • Chlamydia (30–50%)
  • Gonorrhea (47%)
  • Hepatitis B (50–70%)
  • Herpes
  • HIV (0.1%)
  • HPV (high; 40-50%)
  • Mycoplasma hominis
  • Syphilis
  • Trichomonas vaginalis
  • Ureaplasma urealyticum
  • Hepatitis C
  • Pubic louse
  • Scabies
Sodomy
– person penetrating
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Hepatitis B
  • Herpes
  • HIV (0.62%)
  • HPV or papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Syphilis (14%)
  • Hepatitis C
  • Pubic louse
  • Scabies (40 %)
Sodomy
– person get
penetrated
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Hepatitis B
  • Herpes
  • HIV (1.7%)
  • HPV or papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Syphilis (1.4%)
  • Hepatitis C
  • Pubic louse
  • Scabies
Analingus
(rimming or
arse licking)
  • Amoebosis (amoebic dysentery)
  • Cryptosporidiosis (1%)
  • Giardiasis
  • Gonorrhea11
  • Hepatitis A33 (1%)
  • Shigellosis34 (1%)
  • HPV (1%) or papillomavirus (HPV)
Sexual caresses
and masturbation
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • HPV
  • Balanitis
  • Vaginal yeast infection

What are the symptoms of STDs?

When should you consult?

If you suffer from any of these symptoms or have had unsafe sex without a condom, contact your gynecologist or gynecology clinic.

Be aware that you can be a carrier of an STD without having any particular symptoms.

How does the consultation take place?

The gynecologist will ask you questions to find out about your lifestyle and your risk factors for exposure to contamination. During the consultation, you can address your questions.

Together, you will develop the care path: clinical examinations, screening tests (blood) and samples, as well as follow-up and treatment.

If you have been accidentally exposed or you have any doubts, the gynecologist will set up immediate post-exposure management.

How to prevent and avoid STDs?


List of STD (Sexually Transmitted Diseases)

Sexually transmitted infections are caused by microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria that are transmitted through sexual contact, especially during vaginal, oral or anal sex. According to the World Health Organization, there are about 350 million new cases worldwide every year.

Syphilis

A sexually transmitted venereal disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum. The main route of transmission is through sexual contact; this infection can also be passed from mother to fetus during pregnancy or at birth, causing congenital syphilis. Other human diseases caused by Treponema pallidum include yaws or patek (subspecies pertenue), pinta (subspecies carateum) and bejel (subspecies endemicum). Read also: Syphilis | Signs and symptoms: Primary, Secondary, Latent, Tertiary, Congenital

Gonorrhea Gonorrhea (Gonorrhea) – discharge of pus from the penis

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Some men who get gonorrhea do not show any complaints or symptoms. But some others can show symptoms in the form of pus coming out of the penis accompanied by pain or burning when urinating

Sexually transmitted diseases that can occur in both men and women. Also known as gonorrhea or gonorrhea.

HIV infection and AIDS

It compromises your immune system by destroying infection-fighting white blood cells. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This is the final stage of HIV infection. Not everyone with HIV can develop AIDS.

HIV is most commonly spread through unprotected sex with an infected person. It can also be spread by sharing needles or through contact with the blood of an infected person. Pregnant women can give it to their babies during pregnancy or childbirth.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted venereal disease. It is caused by a bacterium called Chlamydia trachomatis. It can infect both men and women. Women can get chlamydia in the cervix, rectum or throat. Men can get chlamydia in the urethra (inside the penis), rectum or throat.

You can get or catch chlamydia when you have oral, vaginal or anal sex with someone who has the infection. A woman can also give birth to chlamydia in her baby during childbirth.
If you have had chlamydia and were treated in the past, you can become infected again if you have unprotected sex with someone who has it.

Genital herpes

Most people with genital herpes do not know they have the disease, so the diagnostic rate significantly underestimates its occurrence. This disease can be transmitted through direct contact, sexual intercourse, oral sex or from mother to baby.

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). This can cause venereal sores in the genital area or rectum, buttocks and thighs. You can get it from vaginal, anal or oral sex with someone who has it. The virus can spread even if the wound is not present. Mothers can also infect their babies during delivery.

You usually get sores near the area where the virus entered the body. Sores are blisters on the skin that break and become painful, and then heal.

Trichomoniasis (Trichomonas vaginalis)

Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted venereal disease caused by a parasite. You get it through sexual intercourse with an infected partner. Many people do not have any symptoms. If you develop symptoms, they usually occur within 5 to 28 days of being infected.

Human papillomaviruses (HPV)

Is a group of viruses. They can cause warts on various parts of your body. There are more than 200 types. About 40 of these types affect the genitals.

HPV is spread through sexual contact with an infected partner. Some of them can put you at risk for cancer.

Hepatitis B and C

Hepatitis B virus
Transmission is not as easy as the hepatitis A virus. The hepatitis B virus is transmitted through blood or blood products. Transmission usually occurs between drug users who share needles, or between sexual partners (both heterosexual and homosexual men).

Pregnant women who are infected with hepatitis B can transmit the virus to their babies during childbirth. Hepatitis B can be transmitted by healthy people who carry the hepatitis B virus.

In the Far East and Africa, some cases of hepatitis B progress to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Hepatitis C virus

Causes at least 80% of hepatitis cases blood transfusion. Hepatitis C virus is most often transmitted through drug users who share needles. Sexual transmission is rare. For reasons that remain unclear, people with “alcoholic liver disease” often develop hepatitis C.

The main method of transmission in developed countries is through injection drug use. In developing countries the main methods of transmission are through blood transfusions and unsafe medical procedures and having sex without a latex condom.

Synchroid

Synchroid or chancroid is a sexually transmitted venereal disease characterized by pain in the genitals.

Chancroid is known to spread from one person to another through sexual contact.
Chancroid is a bacterial infection caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. This disease is mainly found in developing countries, in association with commercial sex workers and their clients.

Pubic lice (pubic lice) and scabies (scabies)

Pubic lice (pubic lice)
Pubic lice are a form of lice that live in hair in the genital area and sometimes on other areas of the body with coarse hair, such as the armpits or eyebrows.

Read also: Lice (body, head, pubis): treatments, size, photos

Pubic lice (Pthirus pubis) are tiny parasitic insects that can infest hairy areas of the human body, generally pubic hair. This parasite lives by sucking blood through the skin, and can cause itching in the infected area.

They are usually spread by sexual contact, although they can also occasionally be transmitted by infected bed linen and clothing.
Symptoms include itching in the genital area and visible lice or eggs.

You should know that pubic lice are not the same as head lice and almost never infect hair on the head.

Ureaplasma urealyticum

Ureaplasma urealyticum infection is a sexual health problem since it is an infection that can be transmitted through the genitals or through oral-genital contact. It can cause complications in women and sometimes serious in newborns. That is why it is important to prevent and treat it.

The bacteria Ureaplasma urealyticum is a member of the mycoplasma family. Mycoplasmas can cause infections that can affect different organs. They affect both humans and animals. Found in the genital tract, the bacterium Ureaplasma urealyticum is said to be commensal, which means that it is the usual host of an organism without causing damage to it. In small quantities, it does not represent any danger.

Read also: Ureaplasma urealyticum (genital mycoplasma) | Sexually Transmitted Disease Infection



Information: Cleverly Smart is not a substitute for a doctor. Always consult a doctor to treat your health condition.


Sources: PinterPandai, Patient Platform LimitedU.S. National Library of MedicineU.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Photo credit: Source: Openclipart, Author: j4p4n via Wikimedia Commons (CC0)

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